Saddleworth Hike

Saddleworth Hike – Wharmton Hill, Saddleworth Golf Course Circular

This Saddleworth hike is a figure of eight walk starting at Greenfield railway station. Like most of the Saddleworth hike routes this is a hill walk with some climbing, mainly at the beginning. Fortunately the views more than compensate. The route goes up the steep footpath off Ladcastle Road and above the now disused Moorgate Quarry. The quarry was in use up to the mid 1970’s and there has been talk of it becoming a designated nature reserve. The disused quarry has an abundance of flora, birdlife, insects and waterlife.

This is an image of the Saddleworth hike over Wharmton Hill and Saddleworth golf course.There are good views over Uppermill, the Chew Valley, and in the distance, to the war memorial near Pots and Pans, which was built in 1923. The obelisk was sited here in order to be visible to all of the seven villages in Saddleworth. The path goes over the Saddleworth golf course on Colt Hill Lane, which is really just a dirt track. It’s then downhill all the way to Tame Water at Dobcross. Then begins the climb back up to the golf course at Wall Hill Lane via the fields near Higher Wade Hill.

Next it’s back over the golf course and on the path to Burnedge Lane, although before the path reaches Burnedge Lane we take a diversion around Wharmton Hill. This section can be quite muddy at times especially after heavy rain but the views over Grasscroft, Greenfield and in the distance Mossley, more than make up for it.

The mast at the summit of Wharmton Hill is always in view before the climb down to Shaw Hall and the A670 Oldham Road. From here it’s a short walk back to Greenfield railway station to complete this particular Saddleworth hike. The walk is 4.2 miles in length and takes around 1 hour 45 minutes. 

Comments

Saddleworth Hike — 7 Comments

  1. Hi. Where are the details of this walk available? Can I get a more detailed route description, or ideally a map or gps file or something? I’d happily pay a few pounds for the privilege but despite the shopping cart icons there doesn’t seem to be a link to pay for more details of this walk?

    The description gives an overview, and if I were on my own I’d be happy to wander around exploring, but there are by no means enough details here to head out of Manchester with small children in the hope of working it out.

    • Hi Tim, the full details of the walk will be available when I finish the ebook later this summer. In the mean time I will send you the PDF of the walk which will be in the book.

  2. Hi Bill

    I forgot to mention that our two year old Basset Hound also managed the walk as well.

    Audrey

    • Hi Audrey, Thanks for the visit. Glad you enjoyed the walk, there’s some great views of Saddleworth from Wharmton Hill. Good to see that you have your young son walking as well. Bill

  3. Hi Bill

    We did the Wharmton Hill walk yesterday with our seven year old son. It was very pleasant and enjoyable. I would recommend this walk for families.

    Audrey

  4. This is beautiful countryside, Bill. It reminds me somewhat of Newfoundland with its rolling hills. I know there’s probably a place here in the U.S. that it looks like, too, but the first thing that came to mind was Newfoundland. “Good views” always make hiking–or walking–in nature worth it. Have you taken your grandchildren there yet?

    Thanks so much for sharing this marvelous place with us.

    • Hi Victoria Marie, it’s interesting that you compared the scenery with Newfoundland. I have never been so will take your word for it. I agree views are what makes walking a great pastime, especially mountain views. Yes my grandchildren have been walking with me but not on that particular walk.

      My grandaughter aged 6 has done a 5 miler and my grandson age 8 has done a 10 miler in higher terrain than the one in the photograph. As you will have realised, I have solved the comments box error. Thanks for your visit.

      Bill